Categories
Reviews and Suggestions

Now on random play from the CD Baby store

JOHN P BLOUIN: BUTT KISSER JOHN P BLOUIN: BUTT KISSERWell composed, hook filled songs with lots of guitar power and rhythmic energy for partying.

Buy the CD

LISBOA: Live from the Grand Hotel Abyss LISBOA: Live from the Grand Hotel AbyssMelodic indie rock with power-pop roots and a wry subversive streak.

Buy the CD

THE PERVZ: Get it Out THE PERVZ: Get it OutHigh energy, sonic blast from the past – circa 1977 punk rock n’ roll.

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THE BLIND PHARAOHS: Moonburn THE BLIND PHARAOHS: MoonburnEverything rock’n’roll is supposed to be: primitive, sensual, sentimental; Strong beats, loud crunchy guitar, sweet melodies; Like the Stray Cats meet AC/DC in a honky-tonk along the Nile; From the surf-instrumental of All the Rage to the beautiful Moon

Buy the CD

THROTTLE BACK SPARKY: Throttle Back, Sparky THROTTLE BACK SPARKY: Throttle Back, Sparkygalloping bursts of pop (“Another Hoop”), stuttering surf-punk (“Joey Enough”), heavy blues-metal (“Age of Consent”), twisted rock (“Pyrite”) and over-the-top glam (“Hellraiser”), Throttle Back Sparky is an 11-song testament to the strength of diversity.

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THE BREAK-UP: She Went Black THE BREAK-UP: She Went BlackGlammy, swaggering, full kilter rock ‘n’ roll with enough 60s psych, lazy lounge keys and Strokes bravado to keep NME interested.

Buy the CD

Categories
Record Labels

The Rock and Roll Report Record Label Spotlight is on Warmfuzz Records

I have just discovered the very cool record label Warmfuzz Records and they are releasing a lot of great stuff including two bands that I really like in Kelly’s Heels and the Trouble Dolls. Describing themselves as “warm, fuzzy, funky sounds,” Warmfuzz has a bunch of great musicians to check out so wander around the site and have a listen to some of the streaming Realplayer samples available.
Later.

Categories
Rock and Roll Reads

Fanzines are alive and well

According to Joe Biel, founder of fanzine distributor Microcosm Publishing, fanzines are alive and well and still thriving in this day and age of blogs and podcasts. They are continuing to evolve and now use the technology that is supposed to render them irrelevant to expand their reach according to The scene changes for ‘Zines (article is currently archived at Boston Herald.com).
Later.

Categories
Rock Biz

EEPI 2005: Conference and Workshop on Electronic Entertainment Policies, Problems, and Solutions

A conference is being organized late summer or early fall in LA that might be of interest to some of you. Called the Conference and Workshop on Electronic Entertainment Policies, Problems and Solutions the goals of the conference as quoted in an e-mail I received are:

Primary goals of this meeting include both providing attendees with insight into the many often conflicting points of view and complex characteristics related to these issues, and to work towards establishing a long-term framework for finding and implementing practical, cooperative solutions wherever possible. This will not be a place for finger-pointing or name-calling. Attendees should be interested in learning more about these issues and helping to solve the many complex problems in this arena that we must deal with today and that we will be facing with increasingly rapidity in the future.

In this day where technology evolves faster than the law, it might be a good idea if you are an indie musician to get involved in a debate that will affect every facet of what you do.
Later.

Categories
Rock on Film

Cream Reunion DVD to be released in October

That Cream reunion DVD I mentioned last week is scheduled to be released in October. Pre-ordering should be available at Cream2005.com soon so keep checking the site.
Later.

Categories
Odds & Sods

Summer schedule in effect starting May 30, 2005

Just a reminder that my summer schedule is in effect starting May 30, 2005 meaning don’t expect any posts on Mondays and Fridays. Like most of my plans I’ll probably blow it and post on those days anyways but don’t count on it. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
Later.

Categories
Wanna Be a Rock Star?

The Rock and Roll Report Music Submission Policy

I am starting to get enough CDs to warrant getting a PO Box (stay tuned) but until then I just thought that I would give a heads up to anybody submitting music to The Rock and Roll Report as to what I am interested in.

Categories
Rock Radio 2.0

WOXY.com adds second streaming channel of vintage rock

WOXY.com, the Cincinnati-based Internet only stream of the former terrestrial broadcaster WOXY FM “The Future of Rock ‘n Roll” has added a second feed of streaming “classic modern rock” that will debut this weekend at 10:00 AM. Full details can be found in WOXY cranks up vintage rock.
Later.

Categories
Rock History

Domenic Troiano R.I.P.

One of the greatest rock and roll guitarists and a Canadian to boot, Domenic Troiano passed away on May 25, 2005. With over 40 years of experience in the music industry he was an unsung hero of Canadian rock and roll. Full details can be found here. R.I.P. Donnie.
Later.

Categories
Rock Biz

The "T" in Tour Merchandise Stands For T-shirt
by Gigi Swanson,

MusicDish Network Sponsor

When you think of tour merchandise you might envision major label artists playing large arenas and selling everything from tie-dye T -shirts, bumper stickers, embroidered baseball caps and in the case of the Rolling Stone’s famed Voodoo Lounge tour‹a custom motorcycle.

But even if you are an independent artist you can run your business like the big acts by utilizing an added revenue stream source‹custom merchandise. As an artist/performer you are selling an experience and fans will buy a souvenir of that experience in the form of a CD, clothing, buttons, posters, etc. As music fans we have all come home with something more tangible than a ticket stub and it’s usually something we can wear.

The custom wearables market has plenty to choose from, but let’s focus on the long held wardrobe staple—the T-shirt. What better promotion is there than a walking billboard to advertise who you are and what you do. It’s generally inexpensive to produce and if made with good-quality materials it can last a very long time. But better than that, there is a healthy margin of profit in the sales of wearables, which can at least offset or even cover your travel expenses.

You can package CDs with a T ­shirt for an "added value" sales incentive such as offering them "half off" with a CD purchase. You can use them as door prizes or as a thank you for the sound guy or the waitress at the clubs you play. The same applies for coffeehouse, church and house concert gigs. Even when you play for free you can earn money and build goodwill and name recognition.

Don’t think selling T- shirts is for more visible and established acts. If you are playing out and selling CDs you can sell shirts. But before you jump in, here are a few pointers to make your promotional dollars work for you.

The most popular T- shirt is the basic crew neck. Not only is it low in cost, it’s a style people are familiar with. As far as color options are concerned, the sky is the limit with the least expensive being the standard white, then the heathers/naturals, and then the darker colors. Besides the basic tee, you can branch out with different styles such as ’70s retro ringer tees, baseball raglan tees and new styles made for women such as scoop necks, baby-doll tees, and the new layered looks.

I prefer 100% cotton heavyweight Tees in the 6.0 oz range for long term durability. Brands such as Gildan, Hanes, and Jerzees have been common favorites for years. Heavier fabric is knitted tighter which enables a better screen print, especially when using detail and four color process. Plus they are typically cut larger and hold up better with multiple washings. But you must think of the tastes of the end user and the image you are trying to promote. That’s where fashion often comes in. Knowing your audience is key.

For example, one of my Rap group clients goes for the extra large size heavier weight tees, whereas a rock group client sells mostly light weight, smaller tight fitting "alternative" tees. They cost more but the look they achieve supports their brand image. Check out the on-line stores of different recording artists to get a sense of what fans are buying and to see what might work with your audience.

What makes your T-shirt sell isn’t the style, its size or color but its logo design. Logo art needs to be readable and convey the image you want to promote, but keep in mind it should be something a person will want to wear.

When it comes to printing logos, you can opt for gel, sugar-glitter, suede, reflective, metallic, glow in the dark, and ink in one color and up to 12 colors.

Screen printing using one color ink in one position on the shirt is the most economical. You have to pay for an art screen with each color you use as well as for any extra handling of the shirt. That includes flipping it over to print on a different side. Some artwork may require added film screens to replicate more complicated designs. So keep it simple if you can. If you have to go with a certain "look" make sure you get a thorough quote before you proceed.

Your logo art needs to be in a graphic format generally saved as an eps file. Many imprinters charge an hourly rate to prepare art that isn’t standard or isn’t vector art for more complicated designs. Most printers carry standard Pantone Colors but also offer color-matching inks for an added charge.

How many T shirts should you buy? The real price breakpoints in the industry start at 144 units, but that amount isn’t practical for everyone. You can find reasonable shirts at the 72-unit range or even less if you plan it right. Funds still short? I know of some bands that purchased co-op shirts with another band or with a sponsor such as a local nightclub. They basically sold space on the shirt to share or subsidize the cost and helped promote their partners at the same time.

If you can get your shirts for under $5 and sell them in the $10-15 range you will see a quick return on your investment. When I taught music business classes, I used to illustrate the power of selling tour merchandise to my students this way: A typical major label recording artist might make a little over $1 off the sale of a CD . He would have to sell five CDs or more to make the same margin off the sale of one basic T- shirt. That’s why some of the major labels have affiliated merchandise companies as an added revenue stream for themselves.

Tour or gig merchandise can be incorporated in your overall marketing plan. It fits right in with preparing press kits, driving traffic to your website, getting people in the door and selling CDs. The right product will promote you long after the gig.

Keep an eye out for future articles on more promotional products. Trucker hats anyone?

Provided by the MusicDish Network. Copyright © Tag It 2005 – Republished with Permission