Can it be that rock is no longer “popular”?

In the New York Post article “Rock’s in a hard place: A dearth of fresh hard-hitters is taking the wind out of sales” author Jim Farber points out the fact that there was not one single new rock band in the top-10 selling albums list for 2004 and that things are looking dire for the near future as there is not one “big” band that holds out hope to crack that hallowed list. Now if we are solely using record sales as the basis for this argument, and these record sales are almost completely of the major record labels then yes, I guess rock is doomed. Thank God I don’t use this as my main criteria for anything anymore, much like I don’t use commercial rock radio as a barometer of what is “good.” There is plenty of great rock and roll on fantastic indie labels that flies the rock and roll flag high but due to the fact that those albums are not on the Billboard “Hot 100” they are almost completely ignored by the mainstream. Sure it would be nice if rock and roll dominated the Top 10 as it has in the past but is this neccessary or even desirable? As I scroll through David Bash’s list of his top 125 picks of 2004 (to be concluded tomorrow) I find it hard to believe that rock and roll is anything but thriving, the difference being that today’s bands are looking beyond what the major labels can offer them (if the majors even were to give them a shot) and are taking matters into their own hands. While they may not be driving Rolls Royces into swimming pools, a good majority of them are managing to make a decent living with their integrity intact. I think in the end that is just a bit more important to being #2 behind Ashlee Simpson on the charts, don’t you?
Later.

4 Comments

  1. Must have been a slow news day at the Post. People have been writing obituaries for Rock and Roll since the late fifties and it ain’t dead yet.

  2. Must have been a slow news day at the Post. People have been writing obituaries for Rock and Roll since the late fifties and it ain’t dead yet.

  3. Must have been a slow news day at the Post. People have been writing obituaries for Rock and Roll since the late fifties and it ain’t dead yet.

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