Categories
Features

Osheaga 2011 in review: When does a lot become too much?

It seems the current trend with music festivals is to focus on cramming as many acts as possible onto as many stages as possible, in as few days as possible, pushing the ideas of comfort, enjoyment and feasibility much, much lower down the priorities list.

Montreal’s annual Osheaga festival is known for bringing audiences a wide array of performances, from different genres and regions of the world, but this year’s installment seemed to fall victim to the aforementioned trend. Now, before you decide whether you agree with my review or not, please allow me to plead my case.

Categories
Reviews and Suggestions

CD Review: Young Legionnaire “Crisis Works”

While moments on Young Legionnaire’s Crisis Works sound like an indie version of The Smashing Pumpkins meets YCNI:M, the majority of the album delivers impressive post-hardcore. On the few tracks which have more of a new wave slant, the Bloc Party influence is apparent. Overall, the guitar work is a strength on this album, which is chock-full of memorably epic solos, bridges and outros. The power and drama of Crisis Works – musically, vocally and lyrically – is what really strikes the listener.

Categories
Features

Nothing Says ‘Love’ Like a Band Reunion

Nothing makes you wish you could win the lottery, or unexpectedly come into money some other way, like one of your favourite bands reuniting for a show. One of the ones you thought you’d perhaps never get to see live, or never again if you’d already seen them.

There is certainly a benefit of a band reuniting without putting out a new (often disappointing) release. No questioning whether or not to go to the show, worried you’ll have to endure a bunch of shitty new songs in order to hear a few of your old favourites. In addition, there are the likes of Billy Corgan  – expecting fans to be so devoted they won’t ask for the old songs that changed their lives, and reprimanding them when they do. It doesn’t seem like a fair approach somehow, even if the artist cringes at the angsty, earlier chapter of their career.