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Reviews and Suggestions

CD Review: Die! Die! Die! “Harmony”

Harmony is the fourth album by New Zealand’s Die! Die! Die! who, as their name would suggest, are often referred to as punk rockers or noise artists, though with their last two releases, it’s safe to say they’ve outgrown these nomers and situated themselves in a category that is much less simple to define.

 

“Oblivious, Oblivion” starts the album with a whirlwind of guitars. There is great depth and layering of fuzzy and distinct elements. The frenetic rhythm is balanced by the comparatively patient lead bassline/guitar. This song is a great example of the transistor-y feel and complex push/pull, patient/impatient nature of the album overall, which is at times paced, at times frenzied.

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Features

Nothing Says ‘Love’ Like a Band Reunion

Nothing makes you wish you could win the lottery, or unexpectedly come into money some other way, like one of your favourite bands reuniting for a show. One of the ones you thought you’d perhaps never get to see live, or never again if you’d already seen them.

There is certainly a benefit of a band reuniting without putting out a new (often disappointing) release. No questioning whether or not to go to the show, worried you’ll have to endure a bunch of shitty new songs in order to hear a few of your old favourites. In addition, there are the likes of Billy Corgan  – expecting fans to be so devoted they won’t ask for the old songs that changed their lives, and reprimanding them when they do. It doesn’t seem like a fair approach somehow, even if the artist cringes at the angsty, earlier chapter of their career.

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Reviews and Suggestions

CD Review: The SSRIs “Effeminate Godzilla-Sized Wind Chimes”

The SSRIs’s often spastic songs mimic manic-depressive tendencies. Highs and lows – a chaotic muddle of emotions, from anger and excitement to lucid periods of sentimentality. In an instant they go from panic attack to a popped anti-anxiolytic and back, and back again, bringing to mind the notion that “mental” is half of the word “sentimental.” If you are seeking some new urgently heavy, but far from straight-forward music, this is the release to check out.

Genre-wise, the SSRIs refuse to fit into any simple category. They now refer to their music as noise-pop; elements of both melody and noise are crucial to their sound. I see it as collage-y, wired post-punk. Stretches of freak-outs followed by chill-outs. It reminds me at times of Die! Die! Die! and the way they play with time signatures is reminiscent of math rockers North of America and Q And Not U. Other listeners have compared the SSRIs to Fugazi, Micachu and the Shapes, Blood Brothers, Health, Liars and the Cardiacs.