Pearl talks debut album, calling Meat Loaf “Dad,” sharing the stage with Motley Crue, and so much more

Pearl Aday, the daughter of rock legend Meat Loaf, has been embedded in the music scene all of her life. She’s napped in guitar cases as a baby and grew up singing back-up for her father from 1994 to 2003, and also sang with the boys in Motley Crue. Now married to Anthrax guitarist Scott Ian, she has struck out with her debut record, “Little Immaculate White Fox”.  Pearl recently entertained a few of our questions…

Q: It might seem obvious, as the daughter of a rock icon, that you were destined to write and perform music, but was there a defining moment in your life when you realized that you were indeed a “rock child”?

A: This is just the way I’ve grown up. Rock and roll and music is what I’ve known for my whole life. If I was forced to reflect and choose a specific defining moment, I guess I’d have to choose the time I was on my dad’s stage at Wembley Arena. When I was about five/six years old it was my job to be “scarf girl” – to bring a different colored scarf out to my dad in between songs. Red for “Bat Out Of Hell,” black for “Took The Words…,” white for “Two Outta Three…,” whatever it was. I had done it several times before in front of the same sized audiences, but for some reason this time I met him in the middle of the stage, dressed in my favorite little gold lame jumpsuit that I thought was so cool, and I turned and looked out into the audience and froze. I don’t know what it was that particular time. Before, I had obviously been focused only on dad and the players in the band, but this time I noticed the thousands of people, the lights, etc. It scared me and I started to cry. Thousands of people let out a collective, “Awwwwwww…”.  Dad scooped me up and said into the mic, “Don’t worry sweetie. These people are our friends.” The crowd went wild and I remember feeling thrilled, scared, but loving it. I smiled and hid my face in his neck. Maybe that was the moment the stage bug was planted. Continue reading