Categories
Features

PIGSHIT: A WORLD WITHOUT GEORGE

“Music is at the core of our being. Can you imagine a woman rearing a child and not humming to it? It's as natural as breathing.”

Just in case you haven’t already been listening over the past sixty-some-odd years, Eagle Rock Entertainment’s grand new Produced By George Martin documentary demonstrates once again, via a wealth of vintage clips and contemporary interviews with clients past (Paul McCartney, Cilla Black, Jeff Beck, Bernard Cribbins even) and protégés present-day (Rick Rubin, T-Bone Burnett) the sheer magnitude of the man’s sonic innovations on, and indelible contributions to, the music industry. Or what remains of it, I should say.

All of which got this Rock and Roll Reporter thinking, for not the first time mind you, what exactly our aural lives would have, could have been like in, dare I even imagine it…

Categories
Features

Pigshit! A ROCK AND ROLL REPORT EXCLUSIVE! THE MISSING CHAPTER OF KEITH RICHARDS’ LIFE

So I wake up and it’s, what, 1972 already? I mean, really. You could’ve flown me higher than First Class from Ocho Rios all the way to a secret Swiss clinic in the middle of the night, baby, and it still wouldn’t have prepared me for this.

Think about it:  I escape Merry Very Olde by the skin of what’s left of my teeth and end up making records in some Nazi-forsaken French basement. There’s Mick Taylor (sometimes), there’s that other Mick (rarely), and of course there’s Charlie and even Gram Parsons whenever my five strings need a chorus. The old lady’s got the kid asleep upstairs, I’m assuming, and downstairs it’s as hot as an ungrounded amp in Sacramento. Nevertheless, the Stones manage to crank out a double album’s worth of material in record time, pun possibly intended, and then it’s time to return to America – the land of nothing’s for free – and mount The Tour To Top All Goddamn Tours. Or so we thought.

“Ladies and gentlemen, The Rolling Stones!” went the announcement for the next two months, seven weeks, and sixteen songs in thirty-one cities over fifty-one shows. Not to mention, while we’re doing numbers here, one hundred and thirty-one arrests – including my own on of all places Rhode Island, perhaps not entirely coincidentally – and probably a hundred Altamont’s worth of injuries and OD’s to top it all.

Categories
Features

PIGSHIT: 10 reasons why The Rolling Stones WERE the world’s greatest rock and roll band

As what remains of the literary world eagerly celebrates the arrival this month of none other than Keith Richards’ long-awaited autobio “Life,” I thought I’d just keep this particular ball, well, rolling with…..

TEN REASONS WHY THE ROLLING STONES WERE THE WORLD’S GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND

1. BRIAN JONES’ HAIR

Not only the longest and the blondest, but the most distinctive coif to come out of the (first) British Invasion – hence his invariably being positioned as the focal point of the band’s publicity photos, not to mention album covers. “Personally, I always make a point of cleansing my hair after every meal,” a young Brian would defiantly inform the press when asked if the band, as their promo boasted, bathed only during months with an “R” in them.

Categories
Features

PIGSHIT: Through the past, smartly

For those who arrived at the party rather late – meaning the first new Stones record you ever bought had a big red tongue splayed across its label – the five years and ninety-nine minutes contained within Chrome Dreams’ fine new Rolling Stones: The Mick Taylor Years DVD will serve as a more than welcome addition to all of your recently-acquired Exile On Main St. collectibles. In fact, should you consider yourself a part of the ever-expanding constituency who swear the Stones’ best work was done during that key half decade between the death of Brian Jones and the arrival of Ronnie Wood, this is one documentary which absolutely deserves your undivided attention.

Categories
Features

Pigshit by Gary Pig Gold: OUT OF EXILE

For an album that received such a lukewarm-at-best reception upon its initial release (even the almighty Rolling Stone magazine used the words “overdone blues cliché” whilst making snide comparisons to Tommy James), the tenth album produced by Keith Richards and company – “The fact is that Mick spent most of his time away ’cause Bianca was pregnant; you know, royalty is having a baby. So what am I supposed to do?” the human guitar griped in 1979, “I’m supposed to be making an album!” – has certainly enjoyed a critical reappraisal and then some over the ensuing thirty-eight years. Why, even the proud papa Jagger who in ‘72 complained “This new album is fucking mad. It’s very rock and roll. I didn’t want it to be like that. I mean, I’m very bored with rock and roll,” today insists the recording of Exile On Main St. “was a wonderful period; a very creative period.”

And, of course, Rolling Stone now places those very same blues clichés near the tip-top of most every Greatest Album Of All Time list it regularly publishes in between all the sneaker and suntan crème ads.

Categories
Reviews and Suggestions

Benny Paul – Normal as The Next Guy…..

Benny Paul- My Kind of Normal
Self-released

When I receive a promo package from an artist/band in the mail which they have sent for review consideration, one might think the music would be the first thing I would check out as that’s what the whole deal is about, right? Well, no. At least, not for me. The first thing I look at when I open the envelope is the (hopefully) enclosed bio one-sheet. There on that sheet of paper should be a decent three or four paragraph write-up about the artist’s history, his inspirations, how the enclosed album came to be recorded, the inspiration behind it and so forth. I am expecting the bio to tell me briefly what is important and special about the artist/band, whether it be the act’s experience, background, mindset, or any other factoid that will set this act apart from all the other acts in the world. In Paul’s case, the most interesting thing about him was this bio quote: “I’ve always preferred the pop style of songs as opposed to the more instrumental (where the focus is on individual talent rather than songs). John Cougar Mellencamp instead of John Coltrane. The Rolling Stones instead of Charlie Parker.” that struck me about Paul’s mindset.